Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Vogue 1092 - Green wool sequined skirt

I found this interesting wool on Mood Fabrics’ website by searching the word “sequins”. Wool, sequins, embroidery, and flowers in yellow? That’s definitely my kind of fabric. I knew it was wide with a sequined border on both edges, so I only got a yard thinking I would make some sort of skirt. Making my TNT straight skirt seemed too boring, so I went looking for a pattern where I could use the sequined border in a more interesting manner. Enter this OOP Tracy Reese pattern, Vogue 1092. I always gravitate to unusual designs and absolutely loved the way this one was constructed.


I used the borders for the “bands” that criss-cross the front and continue onto the back and I had fabric fumes left over. If I’d gotten 1.5 yards I really could have matched the side seams perfectly. A fun feature of this design is that some of the pieces are cut on bias and some on straight grain. In a striped fabric it would be much more apparent then this herringbone, which just means I’ll have to make it up again.


I made a muslin and it fit well right out of the envelope in my normal size after a few tweaks to the waistband. I don’t usually go for skirts below my knees. A good bit of my height comes from my long torso, so I need my knees showing to avoid looking stumpy. However, I didn’t want to cut off the kick pleat with godet insert at the center back, so I kept it the original length.


The backs are cut on the bias enabling the front bands to wrap around to the back of the skirt. So fun! I'm wearing my ivory silk jersey top to complete the outfit.


This wool behaved very well and ironed beautifully. It is scratchy, though. I would not suggest using it without a lining or for a jacket with collar unless you like that scratchy wool feeling on your skin.

Dressform pictures:


Here’s a close-up of the kick pleat and the herringbone print. This was my first time making this type of detail and I quite like it! It looks kind of 40′s vintage to me.



The lining I made from a lovely dark olive silk charmeuse, also from Mood Fabrics. This fabric is just heavenly. I’m starting to realize not all silk charmeuse fabrics are created equally. Some is thin and cheap but this stuff is medium weight and just gorgeous. I’m thinking of getting some more yardage for a pretty night gown or other form of lounge wear.


I actually finished this skirt in mid February but every weekend since then it’s been overcast and rainy around here. Finally yesterday the sky brightened up a bit between rain storms and I was able to get some pictures taken. And now that it’s daylight saving time, I can get pictures during the week and not just on the weekends. Yet another reason to love spring and summer!

Note: Both fabrics were purchased with my Mood Fabrics monthly allowance, as part of my participation in the Mood Sewing Network.

54 comments:

  1. gorgeous. such a clever use of that border print fabric.

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  2. Just simply gorgeous, so creative.

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  3. Oo I love it, so unique and yet classy, I would love that for work on a day I want to be noticed.

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  4. That is so pretty and clever. Did you have to interface the bias pieces for stability?

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    1. No, the wool was pretty stable. Plus the included lining piece is cut straight grain and keeps the skirt from stretching out when being worn. Thanks Vicki!

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  5. This is gorgeous on you! I'm still amazed at how you bounce back figure wize after each one of these kids!

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    1. It's a combination of a low-carb lifestyle and breastfeeding. Thanks Sheri!

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  6. Wow! Great skirt! You used that border print in the best possible way!

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  7. I would never have looked twice at this fabric on a computer screen -- until you pointed it out! Wowza!
    Rhonda is doing her Valentine slip sewalong if you are interested in a pattern for your charmeuse:
    http://rhondabuss.blogspot.com/2015/03/the-sew-chic-valentine-slip-on-real-body.html

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    1. Thanks Kathy! I actually have a number of nightgown patterns in my stash that always get ignored because I'm too busy making clothing that isn't worn to sleep in.

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  8. I just love that everything you make looks so incredibly professional! Well done on a lovely project!

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  9. I love this skirt and it looks gorgeous on you. Also, I love how you made the most of this stunning fabric and created such an unique garment.

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  10. This is a brilliant use of a border print. i have this pattern and never would have though ot this!

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  11. Clever use of a border print and the bias cut back hangs really nicely, why do I only notice these patterns after they go OOP!

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    1. Thanks Allison! I bought my pattern from etsy.com because I hadn't purchased it when it was in print either.

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  12. A very unusual use of an interesting border fabric. And it fits beautifully too. Great job Amanda!!

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  13. This is a great skirt. And the idea is perfect. You can see that sometimes you need the fabric a little longer in the house before you work with it.
    I love it!!
    Wilma

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    1. I perhaps should have made something different when I laid it all out and noticed I couldn't match the sides perfectly. Or I could have ordered more fabric. Oh well, I think it works pretty well. Thanks Wilma!

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  14. What an amazing skirt! Great use of a border printed fabric.

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  15. I admire everything you make as it is made with both style and excellent craftsmanship! In terms of the skirt length, it is perfect. In terms of fashion design and proportion, clothing is most flattering when it is designed to coincide with the natural breakpoints of the body (waist, elbow, knee). This concept allows your eye to flow naturally over an outfit, just like a work of art. Your skirt is a perfect example utilizing and enhancing these breakpoints. Great job!

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    1. Ooh, I love this explanation! Sometimes I wish I'd gone into the fashion industry for a career just to know tidbits like this. Thanks Laura!

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  16. I really like this skirt! Its just lovely and it looks so nice on you! Good job. ;O)

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  17. This is beautiful Amanda there is no doubt about that. I love the use of the fabric but I also liked the pattern you used. I've seen it before but walked on by because I didn't the top but am reconsidering in the wake of your skirt. As always a fabulous job.

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    1. The top was not my favorite either. Thanks Carol!

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  18. Amazing Amanda, you make me want to spend money!

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    1. Hahaha, Carol! Are you wanting to spend money on fabric? I guess that's Mood whole point, right? ;)

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  19. You have so much skill! And maybe a lot of patience too! Well done, there's no way I'd ever attempt this, because right now, I know I'd stuff it up. But you're right, it'd be a straight forward skirt otherwise, and now it's utterly unique!

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  20. Love the treatment of the fabric. A great skirt!

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  21. A work of art! You have used the fabric with such impact.

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  22. oh yeah - that is so clever and cool - really lovely work ::::)

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  23. Oh my goodness! I LOVE this. So beautiful!

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  24. This is just perfect! PERFECT!!!!!

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