Friday, October 10, 2014

Vogue 9006 - Dark olive cowl-neck silk blouse

Here’s the latest installment for my silk blouse collection, this time with short sleeves. The fabric is a lovely dark olive silk charmeuse from Mood fabrics – now sold out – but they have lots of other prints and colorways available. To add interest I used the shiny side for the front and the matte side for the back, back collar and sleeves.


The pattern is Vogue 9006, view B. I made a straight size 12 and cut 2″ off the hemline of the pattern pieces before cutting out my fabric for less of a tunic look. The back and back collar were cut on the straight grain instead of bias, just because I wasn’t sure how it would hang with a bias back. Obviously the front needed bias to get a nice cowl drape.


I washed and dried this fabric before cutting into it. Silk charmeuse does look it’s best when dry cleaned, I’ve found, but this girl does not dry clean on the regular. Lined and tailored dresses and skirts, yes. Everyday blouses, no.

I found that this pattern has a lovely fitted shape for a pull on design. There are no zippers or buttons but look how nicely it contours to my dressform. I will definitely be using this pattern again.


 I starched the bias front along the top, bottom and arm holes before attempting to stitch it. This is an old trick of mine when dealing with bias garments. As long as you plan to wash your finished item, it’s a great way to make sure the seams don’t stretch out while you work with them.


I turned under the cowl facing once and stitched to give it a nice finish. Everything else was sewn with french seams, as I do all my silk blouses. The hems are machine blind-stitched.


This was a simple and fun blouse to stitch up. I have hardly any green in my closet and I thought this color perfect for fall. I also ordered a wool tweed in olive to make a matching skirt, but that will have to wait until I can muslin it to my body.

I actually finished an awesome jacket before this blouse but want to get a picture of it on me and haven't been able to find the time. Hopefully I'll post that this weekend. Currently I'm working on an unlined jacket in wool boucle that is looking promising. I seem to be having a very productive fall sewing wise, which is sure to come to a grinding halt when baby boy arrives. ;)

21 comments:

  1. Lovely. I was just wondering, are you still sewing without a serger? Your finishing to me is inspiring.

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    1. Thanks Renee. Indeed I am still sewing without a serger. Someday I need to post my sewing space. It's tininess will amaze you. I have too many children to have my own sewing room. ;)

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  2. Indeed how nice everything is finished. Great.
    Love, Wilma

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  3. I have this pattern in my stash, yours is so lovely I'll get on with it.

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  4. Luscious looking fabric, I could almost feel it rubbing softly against my skin simply by looking at it.

    I am trying to get into the habit of pre washing, albeit grudgingly.

    As always, you nailed it :-)

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    1. Thank you Nedoux! And yes, you definitely need to pre-wash!!! Also, if you work with wool, I recommend putting it in the dryer with some semi-wet clothes because it'll shrink with the iron as well. There's practically nothing worse then making something you love and ruining it upon the first laundering session.

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  5. what a pretty blouse, I had not noticed that pattern but it looks like a good one. And yay for you - no serger. I hardly use one also (have one because someone gave it to me).

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    1. Thanks Beth. I'm glad you don't think it strange not to have a serger. So many people love them, but I just have never cared to find a place to store it or swap it out with my regular machine. Maybe because I don't enjoy making knits.

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  6. Who would serge silk? Your french seams are lovely as ever and I really love this style of blouse on its own or under a jacket.

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    1. Too true, Gail. Thanks for your comment!

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  7. Beautiful top Amanda. I do have a question about your technique. You said you starch all of your silk garments- do you mean you dip the fabric in liquid starch or you spray starch it? and if you spray starch it, on the right side or the wrong side of the fabric?
    Thanks,

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    1. First I get the fabric laid out to match up with the pattern piece on top of a thick towel. Then I spray starch it and let dry, then iron. It's usually the right side of the fabric. I've not had a problem with the starch causing any type of damage to the fabric. You've just got to make sure it's a fabric you plan to launder in the washing machine or by hand to be sure to get all the starch out.

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  8. This blouse is very beautiful! I love that you did the back on the straight grain and the front on the bias, I wouldn't have thought to try that. It came out really well so I will have to try it!
    Your French seams are beautiful and I am very taken with the cowl facing too.
    At the moment I can only dream of sewing as well as this, I will need to practice lots more! Thanks so much for posting this and writing up very useful notes, I appreciate it!

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    1. Sure thing, Gisella, thanks for your comment.

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  9. Hi Amanda, such motivation to sew ahead for after the baby, and a silk charmeuse blouse that is not nursing accessible, if that is an interest, is really sewing ahead--kudos!! Warmest congratulations on your growing family. We are also expecting a baby in spring. Polka Dot Overload's author is pg too, but about a month ahead of me.

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